Job_Fair_Calendar

Job_Search_Advice

resumespecial

electionspecial

illinoisresumeservices

betterresumesyoutube

nationalresumedirectory

pinterestgroups

bestpriceresume

 

Click here for our updated website.
Using LinkedIn for Jobsearch

by Michael Robbins, M.A.

As the most well known professional development site,
LinkedIn has grown to include millions of potential
colleagues sharing experiences and advice on job seeking.
As LinkedIn expands, it is essential for job
hunters to stay current on new trends and updates
to the site. Today, ambition is not enough.
Intelligent, committed work is the key to
finding the job you deserve. LinkedIn allows for
such savvy practices as locating career histories
from professionals in positions you desire.
Having a robust network before searching for
a job is necessary if you want to find your dream job.

As the site expands, so does the number of connections
available. While 1st degree connections
are direct and easy to communicate with,
2nd and 3rd degree connections permit new ways
of finding jobs through the site. In terms of
3rd degree connections, introductions are
important. This will leave little doubt from the
employer. Included in the connections are
recommendations, which can be used as a springboard
for a new working relationship. Each recommendation
from former employers (preferably managers) will
improve upon the likelihood that the employer will
contact the candidate. Recommending former colleagues
is also a great way to stay proactive for
future necessities.

Communication methods are vital in the LinkedIn
world. Some of these methods are InMails,
which cost money. As this is typically
expensive and the ROI is not proven, introductions are a
more cost effective way of reaching employers. Make
sure to read the profiles of those you are
contacting to see if they are encouraging InMails or
messages. If this is not the case, interviewers will be
turned off to a potential candidate.
A large network can help with these connections. Another
efficient way of reaching potential employers
is through Groups. By joining Groups, you
can send messages to individuals without spending
any money. Personalizing emails will show
employers the dedication to that specific
position, and will let them know you are interested in
that position specifically.

LinkedIn is a professional site, and should be
treated as such. There is no need for a lot of
trivial or personal information. Having said this,
showcasing or demonstrating personality can help
achieve the interview phase. Rigidity will typically
reflect negatively upon the applicant. This is all
dependent upon how the individual would like to
appear, and what positions he or she may be
targeting. The companyís tab will allow applicants to
pre-determine if this is an organization that holds
similar values and morals, and thus if it may be a good
fit. Further information about the company will be
available, including growth by month and department
of the company.

LinkedIn Recruiter is gaining popularity among
headhunters and corporations alike. Thus,
importance should be placed upon the Keyword function.
Thus, in order to be found when these
employers are searching for candidates, any
essential Keywords they might use should be
emphasized.
The profile section is how candidates will
be found. Either through these keywords, zip
codes, or other methods. A more complete and up to
date profile will increase the probability of being
seen by potential employers. This will become
evident when looking at who has viewed your
profile on the upper right hand of the LinkedIn
page. There is also an option to find
statistics of searches your profile matches, which
can help to decide if a profile is complete.

While it may seem obvious that the Job tab is
used to find jobs, there is more to the link. Including
millions of job possibilities, there are
options to receive notices for certain types of
jobs or companies. There is also an ďadvanced
searchĒ option that will allow candidates to find exactly
what they are looking for in companies,
including location and industry. Other sites are
included, such as Simply Hired, a site dedicated to
matching candidates with employers. Trends of
specific jobs and industries can easily be seen, as
employers are constantly updating their information
on LinkedIn. Employers lead by example,
and following in this vein, employees should
updating their information as well.

Micheal Robbins is a Senior Resume Writer for A Better
Resume Service in the Lakeview office. He has
a Master of Arts Degree in Industrial/Organizational Psychology
and comprehensive experience as a recruiter. You may reach him directly
at (773) 525-2450 for resume
writing, Meyers Briggs Assessments, LinkedIn profile assistance,
interview training and jobsearch coaching.

Before the Intervew: Do Your Homework

Regardless of the level of the position a company wants
to fill, its motivation will always be this: to hire someone
who will save them time and money. Your goal is to make
your services so attractive that the firm has no choice
but to hire you in order to save time and money. If
you can demonstrate this, you will be in demand. Such
a demonstration should always be based on a research
of the company's needs.

Information about companies can be obtained in a number
of ways. Large or well-known companies are usually
accessible through on-line or library research. Your
target company, however, may not be large enough
or public enough. Even in this case, there are
quite a few ways to orient yourself to the company's needs,
if you are determined and persistent. There
are two basic methods which can help you approach
the company in a smart way: networking and
informational interviewing.

Networking can work on a number of levels. If you know
someone at the company, talk to her about her job, the
corporate environment and the way the company
operates. It's surprising how much someone at
even the least powerful levels of the corporate
structure knows about the workings of a firm. If the
person works for a department different from the one
you would like to work for, she can still be
valuable source of information, providing you with
a perspective on the company that you may not have
considered. Remember, most people with a little
encouragement love to talk about themselves and their
jobs. Personal contacts are some of the most valuable
sources in locating openings.

Another, more complex research strategy is the
informational interview/sales call. You should be
tactful when applying this method. You may contact the
interviewer by telephone if you have an acquaintance
in common. When calling, make sure you don't bring
up questions like how much different positions pay
and what benefits the company offers.

If you have no contact at the company, it's better
to request 10 minutes of the interviewer's time in a
brief letter accompanied by your resume. In the letter,
it's important to stress that you are seeking
information and not a position at this time. You may
also give the interviewer an agenda for your brief meeting,
indicating the type of information you are seeking.
When writing the letter, always put yourself in
the place of the recipient of your letter: Are
you asking for information that is confidential?
Outside of the person's area of expertise?
Trivial information that you should be able to
obtain through other sources, such as the library?
You will realize that not everyone is willing to
meet with you; however, you can increase the number
of positive responses through keeping the reader's
interests in mind.

A week after you send your letter, follow up with a
telephone call requesting an interview. If you are
granted an interview, arm yourself with as much knowledge
from other sources as you can beforehand. This will
save limited interview time and make your discussion
more fruitful. Regardless of how successful
you think your interview was, always send a thank you
note to the interviewer who spent time to help you.

Research strategies outlined above may be the most
effective methods in gathering information about the company.
If cleverly pursued, these research skills combined
with adequate persuasive skills will distinguish
you from other job applicants.



Post your resume to major jobsites. Here are some listings and special deals for jobseekers. Before you begin, bookmark this page so your can return for additional links!




- Recommended Reading. Employment Books for Success.

Click Here!



Click on banner to find work quickly!
Beyond.com - Free Tools for Job Seekers

- Be ready for your job interview. Look your best for less.

- Excellent Site for Nationwide Jobs.

Job.com


- Sources for New Jobs Everyday.

America's Job Bank


- Free Personality Profile. Find the Right Job.

Careerfulfillment.com



- 40,000 Tech Jobs - Computers, Telecommunications, Software, Hardware

Dice.com


- News, Statistics on Today's Labor Market.

US Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics


- Career Opportunities for Separating Military Service Personnel

Military Separation Jobs


- Website for Part-time Jobseekers

Hourly Jobs


- Diversity Website - Largest Jobsearch Assistance Service

DiversityInc


- Find a Job in the Right Spot - Relocator

Search for Cities


Keep up on business with the #1 source for news, The Wall Street Journal.
Special online service available.

Shop and Compare multiple Health Insurance quotes for free.



––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––


Company Joblistings - Begin Your Jobsearch Research Here
Chicago Area Employers - National Employers to Follow

- Abbott Laboratories - Heathcare Products

North Chicago

- Ace Hardware - Retailer

Oak Brook

- Aftermarket Technology Corp. - Mfg/Dist Drivetrain Products

Westmont

- Allstate - Insurance

Northbrook

- Anicom Inc. - Wire, Cable, Fiber Optics Telecom Products

Westmont

- Archer Daniels Midland - Agricultural Products

Decatur

- Baxter Worldwide - Healthcare Products & Services

Deerfield/Round Lake

- Bradley Real Estate Inc. - Real Estate Investment Trust

Northbrook

- Brookdale Living Communities Inc. - Assisted Living for the Elderly

Chicago

- Brunswick - Marine and Sporting Equipment

Lake Forest/Schiller Park/Franklin Park

- Career Education Corp - Education Services

Hoffman Estates

- Caterpillar - Earth Moving and Construction Equipment

Peoria

- CardinalHealth - Hospital Supply and Distribution

McGaw Park

- CDW Computer Centers Inc.- Computer Marketer

Vernon Hills

- Centerpoint Properties Trust - Real Estate Investment Trust

Oak Brook

- CF Industries - Chemical Manufacterer

Long Grove

- CNA - Multiline Insurance

Chicago

- Dade Behering - Medical and Diagnostic Products

Deerfield

- Eby-Brown - Distributor

Naperville

- Equity Office Properties Trust - Real Estate Investment Trust

Chicago

- Equity Residential Properties Trust - Real Estate Investment Trust

Chicago

- Excelon (ComEd) - Electricity Generation

Chicago/Suburbs

- First Industrial Realty Trust Inc. - Real Estate Investment Trust

Chicago

- Focal Communications Corp. - Voice and Data Communications

Chicago

- FTD.COM Inc. - Internet Flowers & Gifts

Downers Grove

- General Growth Properties Inc. Real Estate Investment Trust

Chicago

- Great Lakes Reit Inc. Real Estate Investment Trust

Oak Brook

- Harris Bank - Financial Services

Chicago

- HA-LO Industries Inc. - Speciality Advertising Items

Niles

- Heidrick & Struggles International Inc. - Executive Search Firm

Chicago

- Home Products International Inc.- Home Organizational Products Co.

Chicago

- Household - Consumer and Commercial Finance

Elmhurst/Schaumburg

- Hub Group Inc. - Global Intermodal Transportation

Lombard

- Illinois Tool Works - Engineered Components

Glenview

- Inland Steel - Steel Producer

East Chicago, IN

- John Deere - Mobile Powered Equipment

Moline

- Jones Lang LaSalle Inc. Real Estate Svcs./Investment Management

Chicago

- Leapnet Inc. - Advertising Agency

Chicago

- Manufactured Home Communities Inc. Real Estate Investment Trust

Chicago

- McDonalds - Restaurants

Oak Brook

- Marchfirst Inc. Internet Consulting

Chicago

- Metal Management Inc. - Metal Recycling Firm

Chicago

- Motorola - Mfg. Electronic Systems & Components

Schaumburg

- Navistar International - Truck and Diesal Engine Mfg.

Warrenville

- Navigant Consulting Inc. - Management Consulting Svcs.

Chicago

- Northwestern University - Education

Chicago/Evanston

- Pactiv Corp - Packaging Company

Lake Forest

- Peapod Inc. Internet Grocery Service

Skokie

- Prime Group Realty Trust - Real Estate Investment Trust

Chicago

- Quaker Oats Unit of PepsiCo - Food Producer

Chicago

- R.R. Donnelley - Printing & Information Services

Chicago

- Sara Lee - Food, Food Service, Personal Products

Deerfield

- Sears - Retail

Hoffman Estates

- ServiceMaster - Industrial Cleaning

Downers Grove

- Smurfit-Stone - Paper Packaging/Containers

Carol Stream/Bedford Park

- Stericycle Inc. - Medical Waste Disposal Services

Deerfield

- Technology Solutions Co. - Computer Systems Integration

Chicago

- Telephone & Data Systems Inc. - Telecommunications Svcs.

Chicago

- Tellabs Inc. - Voice and Data Systems

Lisle

- Topco Distributors - International Food Distributor

Skokie

- TruServ - Hardware Retail Supplier

Chicago

- UAL Corp - Holding Company for United Airlines

Chicago/Elk Grove

- U.S. Cellular Corp.- Cellular Telecommunications

Lisle

- U.S. Foodservice - Distributor to Restaurants, Hotels, Hospitals

Skokie

- United Stationers Inc. - Office Products

Des Plaines

- Vasco Data Security International Inc. - Communications Equipment

Oakbrook Terrace

- Walgreens - Drugstores and Mailorder Pharmacies

Deerfield

- Waste Management - Collection, Recycling & Disposal

Chicago

- W.W. Grainger - Distribute maint. repair, & operating supplies

Chicago/Rockford

- Web Street Inc. - Online Trading/Investing Firm

Deerfield


National Employers

- AmerisourceBergen

Employment

Home Page


- AMP Tyco Electronics

Employment

Home Page


- American Airlines

Employment

Home Page


- AT&T

Employment

Home Page


- Adaptec

Employment

Home Page


- Addison-Wesley

Employment

Home Page


- Advanced Micro Devices (AMD)

Employment

Home Page


- Allstate Insurance Company

Employment

Home Page


- Amgen

Employment

Home Page


- Analog Devices

Employment

Home Page


- Apple Computer

Employment

Home Page


- Applied Materials

Employment

Home Page


- Atmel Corporation

Employment

Home Page


- Avnet, Inc.

Employment

Home Page


- Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation

Employment

Home Page


- Ball Packaging

Employment

Home Page


- Bank of America

Employment

Home Page


- Beneficial

Employment

Home Page


- Best Buy

Employment

Home Page


- Booz, Allen & Hamilton

Employment

Home Page


- BP Worldwide

Employment

Home Page


- Bristol-Myers Squibb Company

Employment

Home Page


- Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corporation

Employment

Home Page


- Cadence Design Systems

Employment

Home Page


- Caterpillar

Employment

Home Page


- The Chubb Corporation

Employment

Home Page


- Cisco Systems

Employment

Home Page


- Club Med

Employment

Home Page


- Computer Associates International, Inc.

Employment

Home Page


- Corel Corporation

Employment

Home Page


- Dell Computer Corporation

Employment

Home Page


- DuPont

Employment

Home Page


- Dun & Bradstreet

Employment

Home Page


- Earthlink

Employment

Home Page


- Eastman Kodak

Employment

Home Page


- Eli Lilly and Company

Employment

Home Page


- Emeritus Senior Living

Employment

Home Page


- Ericsson

Employment

Home Page


- GE

Employment

Home Page


- Gannett Co., Inc.

Employment

Home Page


- General DataComm

Employment

Home Page


- Global Graphics

Employment

Home Page


- Hewlett Packard

Employment

Home Page

- IBM

Employment

Home Page


- Intel

Employment

Home Page


- Intuit, Inc.

Employment

Home Page


- J.P. Morgan

Employment

Home Page


- Johnson & Johnson

Employment

Home Page


- Komag

Employment

Home Page


- Kraft

Home Page


- Lam Research Corporation

Employment

Home Page


- Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space

Employment

Home Page


- Lowes Companies, Inc.

Employment

Home Page


- MassMutual

Employment

Home Page


- McKesson

Employment

Home Page


- Mellon

Employment

Home Page


- Mentor Graphics

Employment

Home Page


- Microsoft Corporation

Employment

Home Page


- Millipore

Employment

Home Page


- Molex

Employment

Home Page


- Monsanto

Employment

Home Page


- Motorola

Employment

Home Page


- National Instruments

Employment

Home Page


- Northwestern University

Employment

Home Page


- Novell, Inc.

Employment

Home Page


- Oakridge National Laboratories

Employment

Home Page


- Oracle Corporation

Employment

Home Page


- PPG Industries

Employment

Home Page


- Philips Semiconductors

Employment

Home Page


- Price Waterhouse, LLP

Employment

Home Page


- Procter & Gamble

Employment

Home Page


- Quantum Corporation

Employment

Home Page


- Quest Communications

Employment

Home Page


- Raytheon Company

Employment

Home Page


- Rockwell Telecommunications

Employment

Home Page


- SAS Institute

Employment

Home Page


- Schlumberger

Employment

Home Page


- Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC)

Employment

Home Page


- Seagate Technology

Employment

Home Page


- Sears, Roebuck and Co.

Employment

Home Page


- Silicon Graphics

Employment

Home Page


- Sprint

Employment

Home Page


- Sun Microsystems

Employment

Home Page


- TRW

Employment

Home Page


- Texas Instruments (TI)

Employment

Home Page


- Unisys

Employment

Home Page


- Verizon

Employment

Home Page


- Wal-Mart

Employment

Home Page


- Waddell & Reed Financial Services

Employment

Home Page


- Wells Fargo & Company

Employment

Home Page


- Western Digital Corporation

Employment

Home Page


- Xilinx

Employment

Home Page


Edit TextDelete HTML Content search key words: employment resumes, professional resumes, executive resumes, marketing resumes, sales resumes, resume writing services, professional resume writing services, chicago resume services, calumet city resume services, illinois resume services, schaumburg resume writing, tinley park resume service, naperville resume writer, oak brook resume writing service, career coaching, career counseling, chicago outplacement, resumes, curriculum vitae, KSA's, references, cover letters, recommendation letters, chicago jobs, chicago employment, employment assistance, finding employment, distributing resumes, interviews, jobs, careers, employment, writing specialists, buzz words, resumes that work, resumes that make employers notice, successful resumes, chicagoresumes, chicago resume writing service, chicago resume writers, chicago employment services, resume composition, resume design, online jobsearch, electronic resumes, scanning resumes, scanable resume, scannable resume, PDF, txt file, text files, interview questions, objective, education, employment, summary, references, career counseling, sales test, resume, career advice, job search, advice, employment, sales aptitude, resume writing, resume writer, counselor, aptitude testing, sales training, employment links, test, links, career change, aptitudes, cover letter, chicago, personality, motivation, job, certified, professional, customer service, seminar, recruiting, hiring, professional resume writing resume writer, how to write a resume, resume service, executive resume service, resume writer, resume samples, resume examples, executive resumes, cover letters, resumes for executives, executive job search, executive resume writer, executive career management services, executive resume writing services, resume executive, employment search campaign, senior executive resume, certified professional resume writer, executive career management, resume development, resume consultation, resume assessment, executive employment, resume services, career transition, resume writing service, career consultant, search consultant, resumes, job search, resume critique, jobs, resume writing, job hunt, executive search, career, careers, career service, resume distribution service, targeted mailing, targeted resume distribution, career marketing, career management, resume services, business writing, business writer, careers, resume writer, cover letters, resume posting, employment, executive careers, executive resume, interview, job search, job seeking, professional careers, professional resume, resume analysis, resume distribution, resume posting, resume review, resume writer Regardless of the level of the position a company wants to fill, its motivation will always be this: to hire someone who will save them time and money. Your goal is to make your services so attractive that the firm has no choice but to hire you in order to save time and money. If you can demonstrate this, you will be in demand. Such a demonstration should always be based on a research of the companyís needs. Information about companies can be obtained in a number of ways. Large or well-known companies are usually accessible through on-line or library research. Your target company, however, may not be large enough or public enough. Even in this case, there are quite a few ways to orient yourself to the companyís needs, if you are determined and persistent. There are two basic methods which can help you approach the company in a smart way: networking and informational interviewing. Networking can work on a number of levels. If you know someone at the company, talk to her about her job, the corporate environment and the way the company operates. Itís surprising how much someone at even the least powerful levels of the corporate structure knows about the workings of a firm. If the person works for a department different from the one you would like to work for, she can still be valuable source of information, providing you with a perspective on the company that you may not have considered. Remember, most people with a little encouragement love to talk about themselves and their jobs. Personal contacts are some of the most valuable sources in locating openings. Another, more complex research strategy is the informational interview/sales call. You should be tactful when applying this method. You may contact the interviewer by telephone if you have an acquaintance in common. When calling, make sure you donít bring up questions like how much different positions pay and what benefits the company offers. If you have no contact at the company, itís better to request 10 minutes of the interviewerís time in a brief letter accompanied by your resume. In the letter, itís important to stress that you are seeking information and not a position at this time. You may also give the interviewer an agenda for your brief meeting, indicating the type of information you are seeking. When writing the letter, always put yourself in the place of the recipient of your letter: Are you asking for information that is confidential? Outside of the personís area of expertise? Trivial information that you should be able to obtain through other sources, such as the library? You will realize that not everyone is willing to meet with you; however, you can increase the number of positive responses through keeping the readerís interests in mind. A week after you send your letter, follow up with a telephone call requesting an interview. If you are granted an interview, arm yourself with as much knowledge from other sources as you can beforehand. This will save limited interview time and make your discussion more fruitful. Regardless of how successful you think your interview was, always send a thank you note to the interviewer who spent time to help you. Research strategies outlined above may be the most effective methods in gathering information about the company. If cleverly pursued, these research skills combined with adequate persuasive skills will distinguish you from other job applicants. The typical job hunter will face a whole array of experts eager to help him or her look for a job - and this includes resume writers. But is there anything a job seeker can do to make sure that the writer he or she chooses will do a good job? Is it possible to determine what one will find behind the listings of such services? In fact, there is much more a job seeker can do than choosing and buying a service randomly. Making the right choice, however, requires knowledge, diligence and some patience. Here are a few tips gathered from eleven years of experience as a professional writer on what to avoid and what to focus on if you are interested in getting professional assistance in preparing your resume. Before you start your search for a service to help you with your resume, make sure you have decided what you want: writing and advice or simply typing. Typing services and copy shops often offer ďresume services.Ē What they usually do, however, is to print on nice stationery a resume that has already been written. For some people, having a resume typed is a convenience if they are short on time. But if you have time, and are determined to get a professional resume, you can benefit from the knowledge of a resume writer. Professionalism in this industry begins with understanding that the key to an outstanding resume is content, organization and the marketing strategy behind it. This requires expertise and this is what you pay for when hiring a writer. To check whether a resume service is a copy shop or a professional writing service, ask them whether they can write your resume from scratch. If the answer is anything less than an immediate and unqualified ďYes,Ē move on to the next listing. Once you have found a resume writing service, you may go ahead and make an appointment for a free initial consultation. This - unless you eventually decide to hire the writer for the job - leaves you free from any financial obligation. Meeting the writer should be an important part of your search, because only a personal meeting can offer you the opportunity of having a thorough look at the following issues. First, find out whether the resume writer has real writing experience. Try to ascertain that the writerís expert status is derived directly from writing resumes. Some experts present their exposure to human resources as their primary source of credential, but be aware of the fact that there is a night-and-day difference between writing resumes and reading resumes. Should you avoid hiring someone with a human resource background? Absolutely not! Itís just hard to find a direct connection between human resource management experience and the ability to write effective resumes. If you are in the writerís office, you must have the chance to examine samples. What you should primarily look for on a resume is a persuasive quality. You should remember what anybody in any business knows: persuasion sells. No matter how shy and timid someone is when it comes to career accomplishments, with the clientís help, a good resume writer should be able to find ways to describe skills and accomplishments in a convincing way. Persuasion, however, also means proper organization of the text, as well as an appropriate design and a clever marketing strategy. Ask the writer to explain how this strategy relates to the choice of design and organization used with the samples. See whether the writer is someone you are able to establish a good working relationship with. You and the writer are required to cooperate: a good writer, who is always a good listener, will match his or her resume expertise with your unequalled understanding of your own skills and abilities. In selecting the resume writer you can cooperate with, also consider that he/she should never try to talk you into doing something you are uncomfortable with. Rely on your instincts, and make sure you choose someone with whom you feel comfortable. Make sure that future updating is available. You should not have to start over to make changes down the road. Writers will charge you for these changes, but it is a fraction of what you paid for the original resume. Of course, the resume service has to be around to update your resume. Well established resume services with long track records are more likely to be in business when itís time to update your resume. When it comes to prices, itís important to understand that professional services charge professional fees, and as a general rule, you get what you pay for. However, you cannot assume that spending more necessarily gets you a better resume. One of the best organizations I know of has fees ranging from $50 to $150 for services ranging from editing to writing, and the worst resume service I have ever seen starts at $300. One thing you can be sure of is that the lowest price is rarely a bargain in the long run. There can be a high long-term cost of looking for work with the cheapest resume you can buy. The cheapest services are usually typists or copy shops, although - as I indicated - they rarely describe themselves that way. All in all, consider this when making a decision about the price you are willing to pay: would you rather spend less and spend weeks sitting out in the cold or spend a little more and quickly achieve your goal? And finally, consider something that will leave both you and a professional writer satisfied after you made your choice: trust the resume writer you have hired. Itís perfectly natural to seek out friends, relatives and significant others for feedback and approval on your new resume. However, keep in mind that people who are not in this business are often wellsprings of misinformation concerning job search strategy and resume writing. Calling your writer a couple of days later with changes suggested by your English teacher, your friend the human resource staffer, or someone who just got hired is not the best way to react to such pieces of advice. Your writer has many years of experience and has spent many hours putting together your resume. His/her decisions should be considered more relevant than a comment made on the first glance. If you are determined to suggest some change, give your writer a chance to explain why your resume was written in a certain way. You have the qualifications and the drive to do the job; a professional writer can increase the chance that in reasonable time, youíll have the opportunity to demonstrate your qualifications and drive at a personal interview. Changing Block Division To move the Building Block Cell Divide you can click on either the left or right arrow buttons. The single arrow represents moving the separator one step in the direction of the arrow. The double arrow button represents justifying the block all the way over in the desired direction. Insert New Building Block(s) Changing Block Position You can change the position of each Building Block by changing the number in the block position entry box. Typing the number 1 will position that block at the top of your Web page Delete Building Block (and all contents) Edit TextDelete HTML Regardless of the level of the position a company wants to fill, its motivation will always be this: to hire someone who will save them time and money. Your goal is to make your services so attractive that the firm has no choice but to hire you in order to save time and money. If you can demonstrate this, you will be in demand. Such a demonstration should always be based on a research of the companyís needs. Information about companies can be obtained in a number of ways. Large or well-known companies are usually accessible through on-line or library research. Your target company, however, may not be large enough or public enough. Even in this case, there are quite a few ways to orient yourself to the companyís needs, if you are determined and persistent. There are two basic methods which can help you approach the company in a smart way: networking and informational interviewing. Networking can work on a number of levels. If you know someone at the company, talk to her about her job, the corporate environment and the way the company operates. Itís surprising how much someone at even the least powerful levels of the corporate structure knows about the workings of a firm. If the person works for a department different from the one you would like to work for, she can still be valuable source of information, providing you with a perspective on the company that you may not have considered. Remember, most people with a little encouragement love to talk about themselves and their jobs. Personal contacts are some of the most valuable sources in locating openings. Another, more complex research strategy is the informational interview/sales call. You should be tactful when applying this method. You may contact the interviewer by telephone if you have an acquaintance in common. When calling, make sure you donít bring up questions like how much different positions pay and what benefits the company offers. If you have no contact at the company, itís better to request 10 minutes of the interviewerís time in a brief letter accompanied by your resume. In the letter, itís important to stress that you are seeking information and not a position at this time. You may also give the interviewer an agenda for your brief meeting, indicating the type of information you are seeking. When writing the letter, always put yourself in the place of the recipient of your letter: Are you asking for information that is confidential? Outside of the personís area of expertise? Trivial information that you should be able to obtain through other sources, such as the library? You will realize that not everyone is willing to meet with you; however, you can increase the number of positive responses through keeping the readerís interests in mind. A week after you send your letter, follow up with a telephone call requesting an interview. If you are granted an interview, arm yourself with as much knowledge from other sources as you can beforehand. This will save limited interview time and make your discussion more fruitful. Regardless of how successful you think your interview was, always send a thank you note to the interviewer who spent time to help you. Research strategies outlined above may be the most effective methods in gathering information about the company. If cleverly pursued, these research skills combined with adequate persuasive skills will distinguish you from other job applicants. Regardless of the level of the position a company wants to fill, its motivation will always be this: to hire someone who will save them time and money. Your goal is to make your services so attractive that the firm has no choice but to hire you in order to save time and money. If you can demonstrate this, you will be in demand. Such a demonstration should always be based on a research of the companyís needs. Information about companies can be obtained in a number of ways. Large or well-known companies are usually accessible through on-line or library research. Your target company, however, may not be large enough or public enough. Even in this case, there are quite a few ways to orient yourself to the companyís needs, if you are determined and persistent. There are two basic methods which can help you approach the company in a smart way: networking and informational interviewing. Networking can work on a number of levels. If you know someone at the company, talk to her about her job, the corporate environment and the way the company operates. Itís surprising how much someone at even the least powerful levels of the corporate structure knows about the workings of a firm. If the person works for a department different from the one you would like to work for, she can still be valuable source of information, providing you with a perspective on the company that you may not have considered. Remember, most people with a little encouragement love to talk about themselves and their jobs. Personal contacts are some of the most valuable sources in locating openings. Another, more complex research strategy is the informational interview/sales call. You should be tactful when applying this method. You may contact the interviewer by telephone if you have an acquaintance in common. When calling, make sure you donít bring up questions like how much different positions pay and what benefits the company offers. If you have no contact at the company, itís better to request 10 minutes of the interviewerís time in a brief letter accompanied by your resume. In the letter, itís important to stress that you are seeking information and not a position at this time. You may also give the interviewer an agenda for your brief meeting, indicating the type of information you are seeking. When writing the letter, always put yourself in the place of the recipient of your letter: Are you asking for information that is confidential? Outside of the personís area of expertise? Trivial information that you should be able to obtain through other sources, such as the library? You will realize that not everyone is willing to meet with you; however, you can increase the number of positive responses through keeping the readerís interests in mind. A week after you send your letter, follow up with a telephone call requesting an interview. If you are granted an interview, arm yourself with as much knowledge from other sources as you can beforehand. This will save limited interview time and make your discussion more fruitful. Regardless of how successful you think your interview was, always send a thank you note to the interviewer who spent time to help you. Research strategies outlined above may be the most effective methods in gathering information about the company. If cleverly pursued, these research skills combined with adequate persuasive skills will distinguish you from other job applicants. Regardless of the level of the position a company wants to fill, its motivation will always be this: to hire someone who will save them time and money. Your goal is to make your services so attractive that the firm has no choice but to hire you in order to save time and money. If you can demonstrate this, you will be in demand. Such a demonstration should always be based on a research of the companyís needs. Information about companies can be obtained in a number of ways. Large or well-known companies are usually accessible through on-line or library research. Your target company, however, may not be large enough or public enough. Even in this case, there are quite a few ways to orient yourself to the companyís needs, if you are determined and persistent. There are two basic methods which can help you approach the company in a smart way: networking and informational interviewing. Networking can work on a number of levels. If you know someone at the company, talk to her about her job, the corporate environment and the way the company operates. Itís surprising how much someone at even the least powerful levels of the corporate structure knows about the workings of a firm. If the person works for a department different from the one you would like to work for, she can still be valuable source of information, providing you with a perspective on the company that you may not have considered. Remember, most people with a little encouragement love to talk about themselves and their jobs. Personal contacts are some of the most valuable sources in locating openings. Another, more complex research strategy is the informational interview/sales call. You should be tactful when applying this method. You may contact the interviewer by telephone if you have an acquaintance in common. When calling, make sure you donít bring up questions like how much different positions pay and what benefits the company offers. If you have no contact at the company, itís better to request 10 minutes of the interviewerís time in a brief letter accompanied by your resume. In the letter, itís important to stress that you are seeking information and not a position at this time. You may also give the interviewer an agenda for your brief meeting, indicating the type of information you are seeking. When writing the letter, always put yourself in the place of the recipient of your letter: Are you asking for information that is confidential? Outside of the personís area of expertise? Trivial information that you should be able to obtain through other sources, such as the library? You will realize that not everyone is willing to meet with you; however, you can increase the number of positive responses through keeping the readerís interests in mind. A week after you send your letter, follow up with a telephone call requesting an interview. If you are granted an interview, arm yourself with as much knowledge from other sources as you can beforehand. This will save limited interview time and make your discussion more fruitful. Regardless of how successful you think your interview was, always send a thank you note to the interviewer who spent time to help you. Research strategies outlined above may be the most effective methods in gathering information about the company. If cleverly pursued, these research skills combined with adequate persuasive skills will distinguish you from other job applicants. Regardless of the level of the position a company wants to fill, its motivation will always be this: to hire someone who will save them time and money. Your goal is to make your services so attractive that the firm has no choice but to hire you in order to save time and money. If you can demonstrate this, you will be in demand. Such a demonstration should always be based on a research of the companyís needs. Information about companies can be obtained in a number of ways. Large or well-known companies are usually accessible through on-line or library research. Your target company, however, may not be large enough or public enough. Even in this case, there are quite a few ways to orient yourself to the companyís needs, if you are determined and persistent. There are two basic methods which can help you approach the company in a smart way: networking and informational interviewing. Networking can work on a number of levels. If you know someone at the company, talk to her about her job, the corporate environment and the way the company operates. Itís surprising how much someone at even the least powerful levels of the corporate structure knows about the workings of a firm. If the person works for a department different from the one you would like to work for, she can still be valuable source of information, providing you with a perspective on the company that you may not have considered. Remember, most people with a little encouragement love to talk about themselves and their jobs. Personal contacts are some of the most valuable sources in locating openings. Another, more complex research strategy is the informational interview/sales call. You should be tactful when applying this method. You may contact the interviewer by telephone if you have an acquaintance in common. When calling, make sure you donít bring up questions like how much different positions pay and what benefits the company offers. If you have no contact at the company, itís better to request 10 minutes of the interviewerís time in a brief letter accompanied by your resume. In the letter, itís important to stress that you are seeking information and not a position at this time. You may also give the interviewer an agenda for your brief meeting, indicating the type of information you are seeking. When writing the letter, always put yourself in the place of the recipient of your letter: Are you asking for information that is confidential? Outside of the personís area of expertise? Trivial information that you should be able to obtain through other sources, such as the library? You will realize that not everyone is willing to meet with you; however, you can increase the number of positive responses through keeping the readerís interests in mind. A week after you send your letter, follow up with a telephone call requesting an interview. If you are granted an interview, arm yourself with as much knowledge from other sources as you can beforehand. This will save limited interview time and make your discussion more fruitful. Regardless of how successful you think your interview was, always send a thank you note to the interviewer who spent time to help you. Research strategies outlined above may be the most effective methods in gathering information about the company. If cleverly pursued, these research skills combined with adequate persuasive skills will distinguish you from other job applicants. Regardless of the level of the position a company wants to fill, its motivation will always be this: to hire someone who will save them time and money. Your goal is to make your services so attractive that the firm has no choice but to hire you in order to save time and money. If you can demonstrate this, you will be in demand. Such a demonstration should always be based on a research of the companyís needs. Information about companies can be obtained in a number of ways. Large or well-known companies are usually accessible through on-line or library research. Your target company, however, may not be large enough or public enough. Even in this case, there are quite a few ways to orient yourself to the companyís needs, if you are determined and persistent. There are two basic methods which can help you approach the company in a smart way: networking and informational interviewing. Networking can work on a number of levels. If you know someone at the company, talk to her about her job, the corporate environment and the way the company operates. Itís surprising how much someone at even the least powerful levels of the corporate structure knows about the workings of a firm. If the person works for a department different from the one you would like to work for, she can still be valuable source of information, providing you with a perspective on the company that you may not have considered. Remember, most people with a little encouragement love to talk about themselves and their jobs. Personal contacts are some of the most valuable sources in locating openings. Another, more complex research strategy is the informational interview/sales call. You should be tactful when applying this method. You may contact the interviewer by telephone if you have an acquaintance in common. When calling, make sure you donít bring up questions like how much different positions pay and what benefits the company offers. If you have no contact at the company, itís better to request 10 minutes of the interviewerís time in a brief letter accompanied by your resume. In the letter, itís important to stress that you are seeking information and not a position at this time. You may also give the interviewer an agenda for your brief meeting, indicating the type of information you are seeking. When writing the letter, always put yourself in the place of the recipient of your letter: Are you asking for information that is confidential? Outside of the personís area of expertise? Trivial information that you should be able to obtain through other sources, such as the library? You will realize that not everyone is willing to meet with you; however, you can increase the number of positive responses through keeping the readerís interests in mind. A week after you send your letter, follow up with a telephone call requesting an interview. If you are granted an interview, arm yourself with as much knowledge from other sources as you can beforehand. This will save limited interview time and make your discussion more fruitful. Regardless of how successful you think your interview was, always send a thank you note to the interviewer who spent time to help you. Research strategies outlined above may be the most effective methods in gathering information about the company. If cleverly pursued, these research skills combined with adequate persuasive skills will distinguish you from other job applicants. Regardless of the level of the position a company wants to fill, its motivation will always be this: to hire someone who will save them time and money. Your goal is to make your services so attractive that the firm has no choice but to hire you in order to save time and money. If you can demonstrate this, you will be in demand. Such a demonstration should always be based on a research of the companyís needs. Information about companies can be obtained in a number of ways. Large or well-known companies are usually accessible through on-line or library research. Your target company, however, may not be large enough or public enough. Even in this case, there are quite a few ways to orient yourself to the companyís needs, if you are determined and persistent. There are two basic methods which can help you approach the company in a smart way: networking and informational interviewing. Networking can work on a number of levels. If you know someone at the company, talk to her about her job, the corporate environment and the way the company operates. Itís surprising how much someone at even the least powerful levels of the corporate structure knows about the workings of a firm. If the person works for a department different from the one you would like to work for, she can still be valuable source of information, providing you with a perspective on the company that you may not have considered. Remember, most people with a little encouragement love to talk about themselves and their jobs. Personal contacts are some of the most valuable sources in locating openings. Another, more complex research strategy is the informational interview/sales call. You should be tactful when applying this method. You may contact the interviewer by telephone if you have an acquaintance in common. When calling, make sure you donít bring up questions like how much different positions pay and what benefits the company offers. If you have no contact at the company, itís better to request 10 minutes of the interviewerís time in a brief letter accompanied by your resume. In the letter, itís important to stress that you are seeking information and not a position at this time. You may also give the interviewer an agenda for your brief meeting, indicating the type of information you are seeking. When writing the letter, always put yourself in the place of the recipient of your letter: Are you asking for information that is confidential? Outside of the personís area of expertise? Trivial information that you should be able to obtain through other sources, such as the library? You will realize that not everyone is willing to meet with you; however, you can increase the number of positive responses through keeping the readerís interests in mind. A week after you send your letter, follow up with a telephone call requesting an interview. If you are granted an interview, arm yourself with as much knowledge from other sources as you can beforehand. This will save limited interview time and make your discussion more fruitful. Regardless of how successful you think your interview was, always send a thank you note to the interviewer who spent time to help you. Research strategies outlined above may be the most effective methods in gathering information about the company. If cleverly pursued, these research skills combined with adequate persuasive skills will distinguish you from other job applicants. Changing Block Division To move the Building Block Cell Divide you can click on either the left or right arrow buttons. The single arrow represents moving the separator one step in the direction of the arrow. The double arrow button represents justifying the block all the way over in the desired direction.